June 17, 2021 - By :

Managing ISF – Importer Security Filing when Importing goods

Managing ISF – Importer Security Filing when Importing goods

Many people in the Importing industry have heard about the ISF – importer Security Filing. United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) introduced this rule on November 26, 2008. It went into effect on January 26, 2008. This might be as familiar for many as 10+2. Simply put, this rule means that the containerized cargo information should be sent to the agency at least 24 hours before the shipment is sent. The ISF – Importer Security Filing was objected to for security purposes. You have to include several other documents as well.

What is the ISF – Importer Security Filing

The purpose of this process is to enhance security and expand the accountability of the high-risk cargo. This will eventually result in fewer exams for low-risk cargo. Also, this provides more details about the cargo being shipped to the United States and about the parties involved in the shipping before it arrives. However, the ISF – Importer Security Filing cannot be used or intended for commercial purposes. But the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) uses these ISF – Importer Security Filing details to assess risks. They also validate shipments that enter the country. The United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has managed to use the ISF – Importer Security Filing process to expand the security of the supply chain to the very starting point of the shipping.

Who are the elements that become a part in the ISF – Importer Security Filing

ISF – Importer Security Filing directly involves several elements of the supply chain. The sender of goods should fill out these elements in the document. Then they should send it to the United States before they ship the cargo. The 10 in the 10+2 process are as follows. These details should be filed on or 24 hours before the cargo is shipped from the foreign port.
  • Seller

Include the name and the last known address of the person who sells the goods. If you are not selling the goods, include the name and the last known address of the owner. Normally, you can find the seller’s information on the commercial invoice.
  • Buyer

Include the name and the last known address of the person who bought the goods or agreed to buy them. If you do not import or buy the goods, for commercial purposes, include the name and the last known address of the owner of the goods. These details also appear on the commercial invoice.
  • Importer of Record number/FTZ Applicant ID Number

Include the IRS number EIN, Social Security Number, or the importer number assigned by the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP). For the foreigners, include the IRS number of the person who is filing the documentation. However, if these details contradict, the ISF – Importer Security Filing penalty falls against the person or the party whose bond is documented in the ISF – Importer Security Filing.
  1. Consignee Number

Include the ISR Number, EIN, Social Security Number, or the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) assigned imported number.  The party in the United States that is the receiving end of the shipment should provide these details.
  • Manufacturer/Supplier

Include the name and the Address of the last manufacturer who assembled, produced, or grew the goods. If a party or person supplies the goods, include the name and address of that supplier. The supplier is the person that is shipping the goods to the United States. In the textile industry, the broker must provide the details of the manufacturer.
  • Ship to Party

Include the name and address of the person or the party that is going to receive the goods first hand and physically. This information provides the ability for the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to predict the targeting. This is another major purpose to why the ISF – Importer Security Filing was established in the United States. There is no need to report the second and other delivery points if there are several delivery points. The first delivery point is enough. If someone fails to provide this information, the Customs can seize and report the goods.
  • Country of Origin

Include the country of origin in the documents. This means the country of manufacture, production, or growth, based on the products that are being shipped.
  • Harmonized Tariff Schedule Number

The Tariff number is classified in the HTSUS, and the final rule requires only 6 numbers. But the United States Customs will accept 8 digits or the full HTS number. The Customs require pre-classified goods.
  • Container Stuffing Location

Include the name and the address of the physical location to where you loaded the goods into the container. If not, where you prepared the goods for shipment (Ship ready). If you are filing the documentation before loading the cargo, including the scheduled location of loading. When you get to know the location, or when you finish the loading, inform the ISF before sending the shipment.
  • Consolidator

Include the name of the person or the party who did the loading of the goods into the container. These are the “10” elements in the 10+2 process.

What are the other two elements of the ISF – Importer Security Filing

These last +2 elements of the 10+2 process are the responsibility of the shipment line. They are
  • Vessel Stow Plan
  • Container Status Messages
The same 24-hour rule does not apply to these two elements. Rather, file the details as early as possible but 24 hours before the arrival at the United States port. You should link all the details related to the origin country. That includes the manufacturer and the HTS number, at the ISF line item level.

What are the other details you need to fill the ISF – Importer Security Filing?

The broker should report the Bill of Landing Number. The importer is the responsible party to provide the accurate and complete filing of the 10 elements. The last 2 elements are the responsibility of the shipment line. If you have any updates, make sure you update the file. Do this prior to the arrival of shipments in the United State port. Only the person who originally submitted the filing can update or delete the ISF – Importer Security Filing. If the Customs decide that you violated, forged, or wronged the filings, they can make penalties.

How to do the ISF – Importer Security Filing?

Onsite Global Logistics is a licensed freight forwarding company. They will get you all the help you need to import your goods. Experience is their secret. They will provide you with your freight needs so you could start enjoying importing goods as a booming business.

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